ROSEMARY GARFOOT PUBLIC LIBRARY

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Project Details

CROSS PLAINS, WI
Completed 2011
15,150 SF

Project Summary

ROSEMARY GARFOOT PUBLIC LIBRARY

Energy efficiency and community input were key in the design of Wisconsin’s first “green” library. This was achieved through multiple design charrettes and focus groups resulting in a sophisticated but straight-forward public space. The library provides a larger, more flexible, and technologically capable facility designed to meet the needs of the community now and into the future.

An exterior environmental feature of the library, the rain garden, is designed to soak up rain water, reduce run-off into streams and lakes, and reduce local flooding. Due to the building orientation and window expanses, 90% of the spaces offer daylighting and exterior views. From the south, sunlight is controlled to allow maximum heat gain in the winter and shield from solar gain in the summer. The HVAC system is highly efficient and recovers and reuses conditioned air.

Developed in association with our partners River Architects of La Crosse, WI

CROSS PLAINS, WI
Completed 2011
15,150 SF

Project Description

Energy efficiency and community input were key in the design of Wisconsin’s first “green” library. This was achieved through multiple design charrettes and focus groups resulting in a sophisticated but straight-forward public space. The library provides a larger, more flexible, and technologically capable facility designed to meet the needs of the community now and into the future.

An exterior environmental feature of the library, the rain garden, is designed to soak up rain water, reduce run-off into streams and lakes, and reduce local flooding. Due to the building orientation and window expanses, 90% of the spaces offer daylighting and exterior views. From the south, sunlight is controlled to allow maximum heat gain in the winter and shield from solar gain in the summer. The HVAC system is highly efficient and recovers and reuses conditioned air.

Developed in association with our partners River Architects of La Crosse, WI






Berners-Schober since 1898